Friday, April 11, 2014

J is for Junco and Japanese Pizza.

J
Presumed Cassiar Junco. Not the stark contrast between the head and nape and sides of breast. While some SCJU are dark, I do not see such birds that hsow marked contrast with the upperparts and with the sides.When we lived in the Carolinas we used to see lots of Juncos at our birdfeeder. At first sight they were not a particularly special bird, but when you watch them long enough they are fascinating and I particularly loved their white feathered tails. Dark-eyed Juncos are neat, even flashy little sparrows that flit about forest floors of the western mountains and Junco TailCanada, then flood the rest of North America for winter. They’re easy to recognize by their crisp (though extremely variable) markings and the bright white tail feathers they habitually flash in flight. One of the most abundant forest birds of North America, you’ll see juncos on woodland walks as well as in flocks at your feeders or on the ground beneath them. I always figured the tail design would be great for a skirt, panels of slate grey and white.

Not a good visiting day for me yesterday, life got in the way, well bowling of course. Hope to catch up today.

This sounded like a good fusion of east and west cuisines from Food and Wine. Togarashi is like a chili pepper.

Japanese Pizza

Contributed by Grant Achatz

  • SERVINGS: 4 
  • Japanese Pizza
"Think fried rice meets pizza," says Chicago chef Grant Achatz, who makes this crazy-fun dish for dinner with his kids. You can pick your toppings, he says, but the most important one is the Manchego cheese, which has a flavour profile that's similar to miso.
  1. 2 1/2 ounces shiitake mushrooms—stemmed, caps thinly sliced
  2. 2 tablespoons soy sauce
  3. 2 tablespoons canola oil
  4. 1/2 teaspoon toasted sesame oil
  5. 3 cups cooked sushi rice
  6. 5 ounces firm tofu, sliced
  7. 2 teaspoons unagi sauce (optional)
  8. 1/3 cup shelled edamame
  9. 5 ounces Manchego cheese, shredded (about 1 1/2 cups)
  10. 1/2 cup soy bean sprouts
  11. Kosher salt
  12. Togarashi and toasted white and black sesame seeds, for sprinkling
  13. 1 cup large bonito flakes
  14. 6 shiso leaves, thinly sliced
  15. 1/4 cup cilantro leaves
  1. Preheat the oven to 375º. In a bowl, toss the mushrooms and soy sauce. Let stand for 5 minutes; drain.
  2. In a 9-inch ovenproof nonstick skillet, heat the oils. Press the rice into the skillet, about 1/4 inch thick. Cook over moderately high heat until the bottom is golden, 10 minutes. Top with the tofu in a single layer and drizzle with unagi sauce. Top with the shiitake, edamame, cheese and bean sprouts and season with salt. Sprinkle with togarashi and sesame seeds.
  3. Transfer the skillet to the oven and bake on the top shelf for 15 minutes, until the top is golden. Slide the pizza onto a platter; top with the bonito, shiso and cilantro and serve.
Notes Sweet-salty unagi sauce is available at Japanese markets.

Have a great day
Jo

28 comments:

  1. I had never heard of a Junco before. Apparently it migrates from Canada to Michigan and beyond in the winter. The female looks totally different in my Michigan bird book.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Funny that, we used to see it in North Carolina all the time but I have never seen it in Canada.

      Delete
  2. I had never heard of Junco, wow, learning so much
    Jo I had trouble finding you so please remember to leave your link when next you visit unless you want to get lost in a Japanese Pizza :) Thanks for visiting me yesterday
    #atoz er at http://myeverydaypersonal.blogspot.be/

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Cute little bird. Will remember to use my link in future. Thanks Marie.

      Delete
  3. Junco...are something new that I have learned today ...Thanks Jo :)!...And Japanese pizza ..looks yummy !!...I have never eaten a japanese pizza so should try it out some time !

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I guess they are particularly North American and not as flashy as some other birds.

      Delete
  4. I'm not so good at identifying birds but I'm sure I've seen this one. Of course any time I see the word 'Junco', a Clash song called 'Junco Partner' starts playing in my head.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. We bought a bird book when we moved to NC. In Canada when we first came here I went for an interview with a printer, didn't get the job, but he did give me a bird book.

      Delete
  5. Lots of juncos here in Michigan. As for visiting blogs, I looked at 25 yesterday and only two were on the letter I. A non-existent link, letters A or B, some G's, it gets very frustrating.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I know exactly what you mean Denise. Then there are the ones where you can't seem to comment at all.

      Delete
  6. I would eat that pizza!
    And we are still trying to clean up the Challenge list. I'm working as fast as I can...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Oh I know you are Alex. I don't envy you your job. You also had a few problems before we started so I don't expect miracles, nor does anyone else.

      Delete
  7. Haven't seen any Juncos in Minnesota, but my husband and I do love watching birds on our deck every morning. Nice post! I like learning something new.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks Debi. Not sure but I would have thought they would be in your neck of the woods.

      Delete
  8. Cute little birds, and wow that pizza was colorful in a pastel sort of way! LOL

    Is there a way to catch up?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I still have the blogs in my blogging reader so I can go back.

      Delete
  9. We have juncos in our feeder as well in the Winter. We put our feeder away in the Spring because the bears come out of hibernation and love to munch on the seeds.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I would put my feeder away too. Bears can be a nuisance without actually inviting them to stay.

      Delete
  10. What a darling little bird! I don't know what half the birds in my yard are, and we have a LOT. When my daughter calls and I'm out in the yard, she says, "Mama, it sounds so pretty there..." And it does! That pizza sounds yummy!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have to get yourself a bird book. They do sound pretty, especially in the spring.

      Delete
  11. Yep, not flashy but a handsome bird and it would be a good skirt template. Japanese pizza? I love a bit of fusion food!
    Lisa at Wishbone Soup Cures Everything

    ReplyDelete
  12. Birds probably do inspire a large percentage of fashion design if the truth be known. The only bears we have here are cute little koalas and we don't need to worry about them :)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You're right Pinky, they probably do. Yes, but they are noisy if they drop on your roof and things like that.

      Delete
  13. That Japanese pizza looks delicious! I wish I could have a slice. Or two. ;)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Have to make it first I'm afraid.

      Delete
  14. I can honestly say that is the first Japanese pizza I have ever seen! How interesting! On the subject of Juncos we do see lots of them here under our feeder in the winter. I think they're very pretty.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Me too.

      I always enjoyed seeing juncos.

      Delete