Monday, December 8, 2014

Movie, Froggy Milk, Dinner,

I finally got round to seeing the movie 12 Years a Slave. A pretty 12 years a slavehorrific thing to happen to anyone and the whole story is very horrifying. I have since read that the people who sold Solomon Northup into slavery were never punished, nor was anyone else connected to his story. As a story I enjoyed it and was appalled by what happened. The film is based on a book written by Solomon Northup to whom the whole episode occurred. As a movie I was disappointed. A lot of the time I hadn’t a clue what was happening because I couldn’t understand what they were saying.  There comes a point in a movie where you have to decide on realism or comprehension and I found the latter to be somewhat lacking. There is one scene where the master is absolutely furious with the slave and I have no idea why because I didn’t understand what she was trying to say to justify her actions. This was not the only time it happened. Maybe if I was from the deep south and more familiar with the accents – but I am not the only person who will have watched the movie who did not originate in the deep south.

How absolutely fascinating. I have just read an article at How to Brown FrogGeek talking about how Russian peasants used to keep their milk fresh by dropping a live Russian Brown Frog into the milk container. Science has now found the reason that this works, the frogs give off a secretion which contains anti bacterial and anti fungal properties which kill off bacteria in milk , but one question they pose at HTG is how on earth anyone came up with the idea of doing this in the first place. Maybe someone had a frog fall into their milk and then couldn`t believe it when the milk didn`t go sour. Presumably they were too poor to throw the milk away.

Saturday night, which is our night for something special and a bottle Roast Rib Beefof wine as well, I cooked a large rib of beef. over 5 lbs. which will feed us for a day or two. I haven’t cooked one in a while so checked out if anything had changed in the cyber world, basically it hadn’t so I did it the same way as I have done for many, many years. I also make a special gravy which starts with me stewing some onions, mushrooms, peppers and celery with sage and time plus salt and pepper. I then add a glass of red wine and later some Bisto.  I have been using Bisto since the world began and find it absolutely wonderful although once again I couldn’t get it in NC. I also add the resulting mixture to the pan in which the beef has been cooked, having drained off the fat. It’s yummy if I do say it. Too lazy to make BistoYorkshire Pudding (my mother used to say I was no good at it anyway) I buy a pack of small frozen puds from the local store. I think they are excellent and they only take 4 mins to cook at 400°F. The pic shows the beef after we have attacked it. As usual I forgot at the beginning. I also tried a new side dish of sautéed green beans, onions and mushrooms which was pretty good.  Matt ate a large baked potato (I had a crispy end) and we followed it with a slice of the carrot cake I talked about before. This time it didn’t seem so bland, maybe because I wasn’t expecting much.

The bowling alley give us calendars every year, guess who picks the one with recipes. This is from last year’s calendar. Not sure how authentic it is and by Mexican sausage I figure they mean chorizo. It sounds pretty tasty though.

Mexican Chicken Pepper Casserole

2 Tbs vegetable oil Mexican Chicken Pepper Casserole
3 lb chicken pieces
1/2 lb Mexican sausage, cut into chunks
3 cloves garlic minced
1 red pepper, diced
1 large carrot thinly sliced and cut into squares
1 cup celery, thickly sliced
3 cups chicken stock
2 Tbs finely chopped parsley
1 1/2 cups long grain rice
2 bay leaves
1. In a large frypan over medium heat, cook chicken pieces in oil on both sides until lightly browned. Remove from pan and place in casserole dish. In the same fry pan, cook sausage until lightly browned. Add to the casserole. In same fry pan cook garlic until just softened, add stock, vegetables, parsley, rice and bay leaves. Season to taste. Pour mixture over chicken in casserole. Bake in preheated 325°F oven for 1-1/2 to 2 hours or until chicken cooked. Remove bay leaves before serving.
Servings: 8

Have a great day
Jo_thumb[2]

22 comments:

  1. Hi Jo - I thoroughly enjoyed 12 years a Slave ... as I saw it a while ago I can't remember what the sound/elocution was like. The beef looks delicious ... and yes I'll have a recipe calendar - even if I never use one! Cheers and have a good week - Hilary

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    1. I did enjoy the film but got annoyed when I couldn't hear parts. Guess I will play it again soon. The beef was/is delicious. The new recipe calendar has some good ones in it too.

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  2. Haven't seen 12 years a slave. We don't watch many films but are going to see Mr Turner this afternoon as JMW Turner (artist) has great ties with nearby Margate and loved the skies/light here. Apparently Timothy Spall studied painting for 2 years in preparation for playing the lead role.
    It always amazes me how people discover certain foods - like the very expensive coffee beans that have to pass through the digestive system of civet cats first ???? No matter how effective, can't think I'd want to use milk that had been 'contaminated' by frogs/toads.
    That recipe sounds delicious but not much different from Jambalaya?

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    1. I rarely go to the movies but buy them. Got this movie on special for $7 which is pretty cheap. The person who commented before you has already seen the Turner movie and enjoyed it.

      I had heard of those coffee beans but I don't think I'll bother either thanks.

      Yes, it is a bit like Jambalaya, hadn't thought of that. The recipe I use for that is quite different so didn't think of it.

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  3. I never heard of 12 years a slave...the book or movie.

    So did the frog drown in the milk or does it stay alive? What an odd thing to find out.

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    1. It won some Oscar prizes as I recall.

      No idea if the frog lives. I would think it would live.

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  4. Have not seen that movie, but welcome to my 'Say what' world. Several years ago my son suggested that I see 'The Wind that Shakes the Barley'. I popped it into the DVD player and could not understand one word. Thinking the actors were speaking a foreign language, I switched on the subtitles. Lo and behold, they were speaking English with a heavy Irish brogue. Once I got the hang of it I was fine, but it was pretty funny at the time.

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    1. It wasn't that bad Denise, and it kind of happened in patches. I'll never forget when we first emigrated, we watched a British cop show from London and couldn't understand a word.

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  5. A frog in the milk? It's like eating eggs - whoever thought about eating something that came out of a bird's butt?

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    1. At least they have a shell on them!

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  6. I'll prepare for the confusion. Pass on a frog in my milk though.

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    1. Are you a southerner by birth, you might find it easier anyway.

      Wot no frog?

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  7. You're not the only one. I have a hard time understanding someone if they go into a really deep Southern drawl too. Then I look like a jerk when I ask them if they can repeat that in English.

    Spoiled milk always makes me gag, so... is milk with a frog in it any better? I feel like not.

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    1. At least I can watch again and try and sort it out.

      I don't like sour milk but I don't fancy a frog either. Although I have eaten, and enjoyed, frog's legs.

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  8. I just bought 12 years a Slave for my son for Christmas. I hate when they make dialects so thick you can't understand. I also hate over use of subtitles. I get that people are using different languages, I don't have to read the whole movie to make it feel authentic. Especially since I am often glued to my laptop and do more listening than actual watching.

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    1. I always watch a movie, but I sure had trouble with this one. Anyway, hope your son enjoys it. It is pretty gruesome in places.

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  9. I loved the movie and was deeply moved and appalled at the same time. I often can't understand strong accents and have to put the subtitles on. It helps.

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    1. I very much enjoyed the story but it was appalling wasn't it? I didn't realise I could put subtitles on, must investigate that. I know I can for the TV didn't think I could for a DVD.

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  10. I love when the months of the year come with food. So fun. Also, your meal looks killer. I'm still newish to eating and making meats. Lots of fun though.

    Have a wonderful night and boogie boogie.

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    1. Me too Ivy. It was excellent, still is I might say. It was a big piece of beef. New to eating meats?

      You too.

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    2. Yes, I was a veghead most all my life until a few years ago. Now I'm learning all kinds of new meats, and it's great great fun.

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    3. An adventure of discovery.

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