Thursday, November 3, 2016

Cure for backache? Balconies again, Fondue Pots.Underwater Pictures,

According to How-to-Geek:

How-To Geek Newsletter
Did You Know?
Astronauts spending extended time in space typically “grow” an additional two inches or so taller (up to three percent of their original height)–this isn’t permanent growth like we experience in childhood, however, but just the effects of the zero-G environment allowing their spine to fully decompress, free from the pressure of Earth’s regular gravity.
now don't you think that would cure backache? I do so wish I could go into space for a while and find out. The reason I am complaining right now, this morning we had instructions from the landlords to clear our balconies. We actually don't have a lot on our balcony these days, but what we did have took a while for us to do. We have managed to store some of it in our storage room which is pretty full mind you.

Whilst in the storage room, I picked up my fondue pots. Then realised I hadn't got the burners. I couldn't see those anywhere and short of taking everything apart (oh Lord, I have just thought, we will have to that at Christmas) I couldn't find them.

I forgot to mention that our local theatre, Centre in the Square, is going to be running some interesting shows. The first of which is Brian Skerry, an underwater photographer from the National Geographic showing his photographs and talking about how he obtained them. I have booked tickets for Matt and I. The Blurb about the show says "Dive deep into the world’s oceans with one of National Geographic’s most seasoned photographers. Watch as Brian Skerry’s images illuminate the vast, hidden world beneath the waves.
Brian has spent more than 10,000 hours underwater using his camera to tell the story of some of the ocean’s most elusive inhabitants. His mission: to enlighten and inspire people to care about the beauty, bounty, and health of the world’s oceans.
Often Brian’s office is icy, predator-infested water and his uniform a 7 mm neoprene wetsuit. Some may see this as inhibiting, but he consistently delivers thought-provoking and captivating images that offer a unique and intimate portrait of the creatures from the deep, and draws attention to the large number of issues that endanger their existence.
Join Brian for an intimate look at dolphins’ intelligence, hang out with the enigmatic manatee, experience icy, temperate and tropical ecosystems in Japan’s seas, and explore the ocean in search of the first photos of Atlantic bluefin tuna in the wild.
On stage, Brian is a passionate spokesman for the oceans he loves to photograph. His riveting presentations inspire reverence for the marine realm, and most of all, they offer hope for protecting the vitality of the world’s oceans.".

When I was a kid, living at home (just a few years ago) my mother used to make Treacle Tart which I always loved and which, for some reason, I have never made. We even used to get it for lunch at school sometimes. Of course, in England, it was always made with Tate and Lyle's Golden Syrup.

Treacle Tart

For the pastry
8 oz plain flour, plus extra for dusting
4 oz  butter, chilled, diced
1 medium free-range egg, lightly beaten
For the filling
1 lb golden syrup
3 oz fresh breadcrumbs
generous pinch ground ginger
1 lemon, zest, finely grated and 2 tbsp of the juice
To serve
clotted cream or double cream

1. In a bowl, rub the butter into the flour with your fingers until it resembles fine breadcrumbs.

2. Mix in the egg with a knife, then knead on a clean, lightly dusted work surface to form a smooth dough.

3. Use the dough to line a 9 in loose-bottomed tart tin, prick the base all over with a fork and leave to rest in the fridge for about 30 minutes.

4. Preheat the oven to 190°C/375°F

5. Line the pastry with parchment paper and weigh down with rice or ceramic baking beans. Bake the pastry blind for 10-15 minutes, remove the paper and rice or beans and return the pastry case to the oven for a few minutes more, until light golden-brown.

6. For the filling, mix together the filling ingredients in a bowl and pour into the pastry case. Return to the oven and bake for about 30 minutes. Serve hot or cold with clotted cream or double cream.

Servings: 6

Author: James Martin
Source: Housecall

Have a great day
 

20 comments:

  1. Hi Jo - thoughtful management ... hope you find the burners. Treacle tart - love it: especially with Cornish Cream ... and so did George Orwell ... cheers Hilary

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    1. I don't think they will be here for a week or so yet Hilary. The burners have to be around somewhere. Please don't mention Cornish Cream!!! How do you know George Orwell did?

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  2. Now that's David's sort of dessert! Actually his favourite is Gypsy tart but that was very much restricted to Kent - always on the school dinner menu here but unknown elsewhere in the Country!

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    1. I think you sent me a recipe for Gypsy tart Sue. I don't ever remember having it in school in Kent. I don't even know what I did with the recipe now.

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  3. I use golden syrup to make my caramel, but a tart made of it must be super sweet and rich. Never made it or tried it but I can see why it would be good.

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    1. It was good Denise. I guess it still is.

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  4. Unfortunately, spending much time in space also decreases your life span. Pass.
    Might want to line someone up to help you when it's time to dig out the Christmas decorations.

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    1. Didn't know that Alex, what a pity. You are right, I think we will get our cleaner to help.

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  5. I wonder if the back ache would leave. Maybe they will let you use their non gravity room or whatever they call it:) It sounds like they are going to do your balcony quicker than anticipated. This dessert sounds interesting...never had it.

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    1. That's a good idea Birgit, never thought of that. Actually there's a place in Toronto where you can float in the air. You must have seen the ads. Yes you're right about them getting to our balcony sooner than we thought. It's a really good dessert. I must make it soon.

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  6. I would love to try treacle tart. It's Harry Potter's favourite dessert. So are they going to start ripping down and replacing your balcony?

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    1. I didn't know that JoJo although I'm not surprised.

      Within the next couple of weeks I think.

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  7. I'd love to watch those underwater shows.

    When storage becomes that much of an issues, it's either time to move or get rid of some stuff.

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    1. Should be good Diane. You're right about the storage although some of it is because of the balconies.

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  8. I usually don't suffer backaches, but once when I had an ongoing problem with an aching back, someone suggested that I drink a lot of water. I did and the back ache went away. Whether there was an actual connection between drinking the water and the back ache going away I have no idea, but I was happy when the pain was gone.

    Treacle pie sounds pretty good. Sugary sweet is what I like.

    Arlee Bird
    Tossing It Out

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    1. Well, I will certainly try it Lee and see if it works. It was funny, a few weeks ago I had crippling bursitis and didn't realise until it was better, that my back hadn't given me a problem!!!

      Treacle tart is really good.

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  9. I love golden syrup so I'm sure I'd love treacle. It's such a pretty word... treacle.

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    1. You think so Pinky? Never thought about the word before. Not even sure why it's called treacle tart. It's good though.

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  10. You reminded me that Christmas is getting close. Eek. I hope the building work isn't too noisy.

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    1. Yes, not that long Helen. It wasn't as they didn't do too much. See next post.

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