Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Bursitis, Construction,

Well, so now I am unhappy. At some point over the weekend, my hip started hurting really badly - bursitis again I think - so today, being Monday I couldn't bowl. I tried throwing three balls and it just hurt too damned much. Luckily I had a bowl ahead and one of the games was pretty good. We still didn't win any points unfortunately with just Matt and another guy bowling. So, everyone please keep your fingers crossed for me that I can bowl again on Thursday.

We had to turn off our air conditioner today the construction workers were making so much dust it looked like a foret fire. We figured it might all be sucked into the apartment by the A/C - as we were going out it didn't matter too much, but I am slightly concerned about next year when they finally get round to us, that if it is as hot as it has been this year, we might end up suffocating. The balcony doors are locked shut (I don't know how) on the ones they are re-doing. Ours is OK at the moment, but for the future. Oh well, we will find out I guess.

Not a whole helluva lot happening in our lives at the moment. I do have to go to the family doc for the results of my blood tests a couple of weeks ago to see if I can stay off my statin pills. I also hope I can go for another injection from my orthopaedic surgeon (Dougie Howser) who is so young looking to fix my bursitis.

I have always liked different breads, especially rustic recipes or Italian and French breads. The Maltese used to have a fabulously crusty bread too. So when I saw this one it appealed to me although I would probably never make it myself these days. It looks delicious though.

"Kneadless" Black Olive and Herb Yeast Loaves

Makes: 2 large loaves, about 12 slices each

These rustic olive- and herb-flecked loaves are light-textured, flavorful, aromatic and crisp on top. They are a fine accompaniment to many hearty soups and stews. To simplify preparations, kneading is skipped and the gluten is developed by beating the dough with an electric mixer. Although the recipe calls for regular active dry yeast, a quick-rise or rapid-rise yeast may be substituted by slightly reducing the total amount used; the rising times may be a little shorter than for regular yeast. Recipe by Nancy Baggett for EatingWell.

1 1/2 Tbs (about 2 packets) active dry yeast, or 1 tablespoon quick-rising yeast
2/3 cup lukewarm water, plus 2 1/2 cups hot (110-115°F) water
3 1/2 cups all-purpose flour
2 1/2 Tbs flavorful olive oil, plus more for brushing
3 Tbs sugar
3 Tbs finely chopped fresh chives, or 2 teaspoons dried
1 1/4 tsp (generous) dried oregano and dried thyme leaves, or 3 1/2 tablespoons finely minced fresh rosemary leaves
2 1/4 tsp salt
3 1/4 cups whole-wheat flour or white whole-wheat flour, (see Tip), plus a little more for dusting
2/3 cup well-drained, pitted and finely chopped Ni├žoise, Kalamata or other very flavorful brined black olives

1. In a 1-cup measure, sprinkle yeast over 2/3 cup lukewarm water. Let stand, stirring occasionally, until the yeast dissolves.

2. Place all-purpose flour, oil, sugar, chives, oregano and thyme (or rosemary) and salt in a large mixing bowl. Beat in the 2 1/2 cups hot water with an electric mixer on low speed (using a paddle attachment if possible) until well blended and smooth. Slowly beat in the yeast mixture until evenly incorporated. Gradually raise the speed to medium (or almost to the point the mixture begins to splatter), and beat for 4 minutes if using a heavy-duty stand mixer or 5 minutes if using a hand mixer.

3. Using a large wooden spoon, vigorously stir whole-wheat flour and olives into the dough until evenly incorporated; it’s all right if the dough is slightly sticky and wet. Turn out the dough into a very large lightly oiled bowl. Lightly brush the top of the dough with olive oil until evenly covered. Tightly cover the bowl with plastic wrap and set in a warm spot (see Tip) until the dough doubles in bulk, 50 minutes to 1 hour.

4. Generously coat 2 round 1 1/2- to 2-quart (6- to 8-cup capacity) ovenproof casseroles or souffle dishes with cooking spray. Coat your hand with cooking spray; press down the dough in the bowl, then divide it between the prepared baking dishes. Drizzle a little olive oil over the top of each; with your fingertips, smooth out the dough and evenly brush it with the oil. Sprinkle each loaf with about 1 tablespoon whole-wheat flour until evenly coated. Loosely cover the dishes with plastic wrap. Set in a warm spot until the dough rises to the plastic wrap, 45 minutes to 1 1/2 hours (depending on the temperature of your room).

5. Remove the plastic wrap; let the dough rise until it's about 1/4 to 1/2 inch above the rims, 15 to 30 minutes. Meanwhile, preheat the oven to 400°F.

6. Transfer the loaves to the middle of the oven; avoid jarring, as they may deflate. Bake until the tops are nicely browned, about 30 minutes. Remove the loaves from the dishes (run a table knife around the edge to loosen if necessary), place top-side up on a baking sheet, and continue baking until they are well browned on top and sound hollow when tapped on the bottom, 10 to 15 minutes more. Let the loaves cool for at least 15 minutes before serving. Cut into thick wedges.


Have a great day
 

22 comments:

  1. Hi Jo - Bursitis is exceedingly painful ... hope you can get some relief soon. The breads look good ... the building works sounds rather challenging ... take care - cheers Hilary

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    1. It is Hilary. Although I am now wondering if my diagnosis is correct and maybe I sprained it. Will see what the doc says. Challenging is a very polite word for all this construction.

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  2. Bursitis is painful - I'm suffering with it, too. The bread sounds tasty. I've had an urge to make some recently but the kneading put me off so this sounds a good option.

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    1. I assumed bursitis Denise, had it before in this hip. But now I'm wondering. Will see what the specialist says. Sorry you are suffering from it too. It is painful. I think this bread would be really good.

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  3. Well, I am now into week four with the hip problem. Last time when I sprained it, it was six weeks of healing. Not sure how long this will take, but you have my sympathy.

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    1. You sprained your hip Denise? How did you do that. Maybe I did that too. Sure hurts all the way down. I assumed bursitis because I had it before.

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    2. I injured it digging in the garden. And then I stressed it in yoga. Now I am confined to do nothing if I feel any pain. Getting old sucks. I also wrongly assumed bursitis.

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    3. Well I will have to see what the orthopaedic surgeon says Denise. Mae West said it "getting old isn't for sissies".

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  4. Hope your hip feels better soon so you can bowl later this week.

    Betty

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    1. My first reply seems to have disappeared into cyber space. I said thanks Betty, so very much do I.

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  5. I'm sorry to hear about your bursitis pain. My dad had it in his shoulder and it was so painful. Are they going to keep working on the balconies throughout the fall?

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    1. Thanks JoJo. I have had it before and I agree, it's painful. As far as I know. I believe they can't pour concrete after a certain date (or temperature). We shall see.

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  6. Sorry you're in pain.
    I'd definitely find out when they are doing your balcony. It would be unthinkable to do it during the summer.

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    1. Thanks Alex.

      They have been doing all the others during the summer so far. I think it must be terrible to be locked in like that so you can't open your windows and can't use the air because of the dust.

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  7. It's just so frustrating when you just can't do something.

    I love olives and that bread sounds delicious.

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    1. Yes it is Diane. I am hobbling around like an old woman - well, I am an old woman, but you know what I mean.

      I love olives too.

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  8. I understand about bursitis and sorry to hear it acted up again. I hope it eases by Thursday. Do you get affected when rain is around? I did something on the weekend-who knows what but I couldn't move my neck to the right or move my arms up-it seemed to be all connected. I can feel the rain coming as well. My neck is beginning to ease up a bit which is good but since I'm double jointed, it doesn't take much. Does cold or heat work? Maybe a combination of both will help ease things a bit. I would find out when they will be working on your balcony but 10 to 1 it will be the summer. I am certain that if you asked, they would have no idea what to say to you. I would think it would be a health and safety issue if you could not turn on your air. i would find out if there are any bi-laws around...look at me with unwanted advice! At least this heat will break by Friday

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    1. I've tried using IcyHot Birgit, but hadn't thought about using heat or cold. Not a bad idea. I had a stiff neck and shoulders a few weeks back. Not funny. In my case it was a draught. Well all the people this year have had to go through it. I suppose you can always leave the apartment which people have certainly done. Our balcony will likely be one of the last they do.

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  9. For someone as active as you that must be so annoying. My sister gets bursitis of the elbows. She says it's from carrying heavy shopping bags up stairs all the time. Things like that are so painful so I hope you can get some relief from the young doctor.

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    1. Thanks Pinky, it is. Won't be able to do exercises tomorrow either. Hopefully I can get an appointment with the surgeon asap

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  10. Ack. Sorry that you had to miss bowling.

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