Tuesday, April 12, 2016

J is for Jackfruit

J is for Jackfruit

This is a fruit which is related to the mulberry and the fig. It is also the largest fruit in the world and can weigh as much as 80 lbs.35 inches in length and 20 inches diameter. The fruit is native to parts of South and South East Asia and there seems to be as many ways of preparing the fruit as there are countries in that area. A lot of countries use it in curries and some dry out the seeds for use in curries too. I think the only way we will ever come across it is frozen in packages but if it's not available at your supermarket, it probably soon will be. More and more strange fruits seem to be making their way into the stores. The picture doesn't give you any kind of perspective on it's size. The skin looks like a canteloupe to me too.

Jackfruit Curry with Bell Peppers and Cashews

Shauna McCoy

  • 2 packages frozen jackfruit, preferably unripe/green, OR 2 cans prepared jackfruit in
    water or brine (not syrup), drained
  • 1 large yellow onion, cut into 12 wedges
  • 1 large green bell pepper, de-seeded and chopped/sliced
  • 1 large red bell pepper, de-seeded and chopped/sliced
  • 5 dried black mushrooms, soaked in water for 2 hours to rehydrate then drained, thinly sliced
  • 1 cup dry roasted (unsalted) cashews
  • 1 can coconut milk
  • generous handful of fresh basil for garnish
  • 2 Tbsp. coconut oil for stir-frying
  • white wine (or white cooking wine) for stir-frying
PASTE:
  • 3 large green onions (or 6 small), sliced thin
  • 2 fresh red chilies (or more if you want it ultra spicy), sliced thin
  • 8 whole lime leaves, fresh or frozen, snipped into tiny strips
  • 8 cloves garlic, minced
  • 1 Tbsp lime juice
  • 2 Tbsp coconut aminos
  • 1 Tbsp dulse, snipped into flakes
  • 1/2 cup fresh basil leaves
  • 2 Tbsp coconut oil
  • 4 Tbsp tamari sauce
  • 1 Tbsp coconut sugar
PREPARATION
  1. First, prepare the curry paste. Place all paste ingredients together in a food processor or mini-chopper and process well. Lime Leaf Tip: Prepare the lime leaves using kitchen scissors to cut out (and discard) the hard central stem. If lime leaves are frozen, you can quickly thaw them by running under some hot water. Set paste aside.
  2. Cut jackfruit into desired bite size pieces, either in strips or cubes/chunks (as you would with chicken). Set aside.
  3. Place 2 Tbsp. oil in a wok or deep frying pan over medium-high heat. Add the onion and stir-fry 3 minutes.Add a little of the wine (1/2 to 1 Tbsp. at a time) instead of more oil whenever wok/pan becomes dry.
  4. Add the bell peppers. Continue stir-frying another 3 minutes, or until peppers have softened and turned bright in color. Again, add a little wine when wok/pan becomes dry to keep ingredients frying nicely.
  5. Add the green jackfuit and black mushrooms. Stir-fry another 3 minutes and add wine for stir-frying if needed.
  6. Add the paste you made earlier, plus the coconut milk. Stir well to combine.
  7. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat to medium-low, allowing curry to gently simmer 2-3 minutes, or until ingredients are nicely cooked, but not overcooked. Tip: Try not to overcook this curry, or you will lose the fragrance and taste of the paste.
  8. Just before serving, add the cashews, gently stirring them in. Now do a taste-test, looking for a balance of salty, sour, sweet and spicy. If not salty enough, add more tamari, or a little salt. If too salty for your taste, add another squeeze of lime/lemon juice. If not spicy enough, add more fresh chili. If too spicy, add a little more coconut milk. Add a little more sugar if too sour.
  9. To serve, either portion out in bowls or on plates, or ladle the curry into a serving dish. Sprinkle with generous amounts of fresh basil, and serve with brown rice or quinoa. ENJOY!
Serves 4 – 6, depending on how much they like curry!

Have a great day
 

34 comments:

  1. I love to eat this fruit. I have not prepared any dishes using this. Your dish sounds great...

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    1. Well at least you can get it WW. Most of us are unfamiliar with the fruit.

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  2. That's a curry I'd love to tackle. Shame we can't get jackfruit though.

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    1. If it comes frozen Bob, it might well be available in some stores in the UK. Maybe in big cities like London though I guess.

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  3. I just looked up jackfruit and apparently you can grow them here. I've never seen them for sale though.

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    1. OK Helen, start growing them and then cooking them!!!

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  4. Guess I don't know jack about this fruit either, pun intended.

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    1. Apparently it is available frozen from what I read, Denise, not sure if it's on this side of the world.

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  5. That certainly is bigger than a watermelon.
    And Denise's comment - rim shot!

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  6. Jumping Jupiter, I think I'll have a round of some Jolly Jo! At least thats what I'm calling it!

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    1. Hope you can find some to have a round of Spacerguy

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  7. 80 lbs! Wow! And I thought watermelons were heavy.

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  8. Another interesting food I hadn't heard of :) I'll have to look for it at the store this weekend (If I remember :)

    betty

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    1. Well they say the Southern States and apparently custard apples are indigenous to Australia too Betty.

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  9. What does it taste like? I'm not much of a fruit fan, mostly preferring it pulverised beyond recognition or in things :) I've started to come round to dried fruits though.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

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    1. Never having actually tried it Tasha, I can't tell you. That's unusual, most people enjoy fruit.

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  10. You're educating me about fruits from around the world in this A to Z. Love it! You asked Carlton on my That's Purrfect blog where the Mr and Mrs are from. We're from Devon in England.

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    1. I think that's it for fruits Patricia. Nice part of the world, Devon, went there for my first honeymoon, Cornwall for my second. Lived in Kent most of my life before we emigrated, but was born in Cheshire.

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  11. I think I've seen it in the shops. It's in the weird and exotic fruit section along with the other odd looking things. I'm too unadventurous to buy it!

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    1. You surprise me Pinky, I thought you were the adventurous kind. Go get yourself a piece and give me an opinion.

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  12. I may be searching for it soon. I'm giving up all manufactured foods to heal. I'll need something to make this interesting! LOL

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    1. Hope you can find it Yolanda. Do let me know if you are able to.

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  13. I've actually heard the name but didn't really know much about it. I'm going to watch for it now.

    Susan Says

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    1. You seem to be the only one Susan. I will be interested to know if you find it.

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  14. Jo, you're pulling out all the strings as this is yet another fruit I've never heard of. Thanks for expanding my culinary horizons.

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    1. Unfortunately I can't continue it the food will be a bit more regular tomorrow Stephen.

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  15. The skin does look like a canteloupe's skin but since it's used in curries, I'm guessing it doesn't taste like canteloupe. Am I right?

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    1. I don't know Cynthia I have never tasted it. No reason not to use cantaloupe in curry though. Fruit is often curried.

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  16. This is one big fruit! Never heard of it.

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    1. Nor had I before I researched Birgit.

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  17. Replies
    1. Me too Ivy. It may become available one of these days.

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