Monday, April 11, 2016

I is for ilama.

ilama

1.Definition: tropical American tree grown in southern United States having a whitish pink-tinged fruit
2.Definition: whitish tropical fruit with a pinkish tinge related to custard apples; grown in the southern United States
The ilama (also known as the tree of the ilamaAnnona diversifolia) is a tropical fruit tree found in Central America. The name is derived from theSpanish from the Nahuatl ilamatzapotl, of which the rough translation is "old woman's sapote". The name is also applied to a similar fruit, soncoya orcabeza de negro (A. pupurea), which is cultivated as an alternative to the cherimoya. The soncoya is similar in size to the ilama, but grey-brown in color with hard bumps on the surface, and orange flesh that tastes like mango or pawpaw.
The ilama fruit is either eaten on the half-shell or scooped out with a tool, usually chilled when served. It is sometimes served with a little cream and sugar to intensify the flavor, or with a drop of lime or lemon juice to bring in a tart and bitter tinge. The only recipe I could find was for the Custard Apple which is called the Chirimoya in Mexico where this recipe originates.

Mousse de ChirimoyaServes six 

Ingredients
1 ripe chirimoya (300 or 400 gr.)
1/4 Cup heavy cream
2/3 Cup whole milk
1leaf of unflavored gelatin
1 Tbsp sugar
Decoration
I or 2 white grapes per individual mousse
2 Tbsp dark brown sugar
1 Tbsp dark rum
Sprigs of fresh mint
ProcedureCut the chirimoya in quarters and carefully remove the seeds.  Put the chirimoya flesh into your blender jar.
In a heavy saucepan, heat the milk, the cream, and the sugar.  Stir constantly to make sure that the mixture does not stick.  Dissolve the gelatin in cold water.
Once the mixture begins to cook, add the dissolved gelatin.  Allow the mix to cook for a minute more, without moving the saucepan from the burner.  After a minute, take the pan off the fire and allow the mixture to cool.
Once the mixture is cool, pour it into the blender along with the chirimoya flesh.  Blend until the mixture is smooth and silky.
Pour the mixture into individual-serving ramekins and chill in the refrigerator for at least four hours before serving.
To make the grape garnish, roll each grape first in the rum and then in the brown sugar.  Prepare the garnish just before serving.  Unmold each ramekin onto a small dessert plate and top with one or two grapes, a small spoonful of rum, and a sprig of fresh mint.




Have a great day

36 comments:

  1. That is really interesting, Jo. We have something that looks really similar but green colour here in Malaysia.

    Once again, I have to apologise for the 2-year wait for a reply to your comment. I had sadly neglected that particular blog, but invite you to pay me a little visit to my current A-Z here:

    Open Minded Mormon A-Z

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Not something I am familiar with although I have encountered a custard apple. I have been to see you during this blog Duncan. I will pop back.

      Delete
  2. OK. I have never heard of any of those fruits. Ya got me on that one. Have you had it before?

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope Denise, I don't know it either. Sounds interesting though. Custard apples are available more widely I understand.

      Delete
  3. At first glance I thought you had misspelt llama! I have never heard of an ilama and I don't think I have ever seen a chirimoya for sale here in Britain. Even so, the recipe looks delicious! That's Purrfect

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Which is why I didn't use a capital i in my first line. I kept thinking it was llama too. They are not widely available PL so not surprised you haven't seen them in Britain.

      Delete
  4. Wow I've never seen or heard of that one!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well it is available in the States apparently. Does Russell drive down south? If so, ask him to look out for them for you JoJo.

      Delete
  5. I'd never heard of ilama. I've heard of llamas though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I try to find new things, not always possible Alex.

      Delete
  6. I've never heard of this. I wonder where I can find it. Probably a specialty food store.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Supposed to be in the South Stephen. Let me know if you find one.

      Delete
  7. I have not heard of this; learned again something new :)

    betty

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Always nice to find out something different in food Betty. Well, it is to me anyway.

      Delete
  8. Replies
    1. I guess NC isn't southern enough Diane

      Delete
  9. Strange fruit. Somehow I was thing LLama... animal...hahaha on me!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You were not alone there Dixie.

      Delete
  10. Where in the South do they grow these? I don't think I've seen one...

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It didn't say John, just what I said above.

      Delete
  11. I don't think I've tried this fruit before. But the custard looks quite tasty!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. I haven't either Cynthia but I agree the custard does look good.

      Delete
  12. J here, of the #atozchallenge Arlee Bird's A to Z Ambassador Team. Thanks for stopping by Arlee's blog to comment on my Manhattan story.
    How was the first week of the challenge for you? Are you meeting your goals of posting and hopping to other blogs?
    My blog's giveaways are still going!
    http://jlennidornerblog.what-are-they.com
    I've never seen or heard of this. The picture of the custard looks a lot like flan.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Mostly thanks J. Although I am perhaps not visiting as many as I would like. Will check out your blog.

      I never thought of that, it does look like flan.

      Delete
  13. I adore Custard Apples and prefer them eaten as they come. I've never tried to cook them. The season seems quite short.

    Am back from my trip to China and enjoying strolling around the blogs here and there. Looks like you're going well, Jo.

    Denise :-)

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Well at least you've heard of them Denise, most people haven't. Lucky you going to China. I would love to visit. Yup, the blogging is going OK.

      Delete
  14. I found a couple of articles relating to this fruit Jo - the fruit itself doesn't transport well, hence its scarcity. Here's a link to a page describing where/how its grown in Florida https://hort.purdue.edu/newcrop/morton/ilama.html

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Interesting Sue, that's why most haven't heard of it. Seems to be available in Australia though. Will check the link later.

      Delete
  15. I've never heard of ilama. I learn something new every day with this challenge

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nor me Helen but I gather you have custard apples in Oz and they are supposed to be similar.

      Delete
  16. Do you have custard apples over there? I thought they were an Australian native. My grandparents had a custard apple tree in their back yard. Granddad used to make a dessert from them. A pudding I think.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Seems they have them in Florida Pinky, but not round here. Here's something you can try then with custard apples.

      Delete
  17. I'd like to try this fruit. Sounds pretty good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Think you'd have to go right down south to get it Birgit unless it turns up here frozen.

      Delete