Tuesday, April 5, 2016

D is for Daikon

D is for Daikon

To start the day; I am receiving comments from lots of new people, thank you so very much. I try and return the visits, but many of you are not leaving me a viable link to your blog. On the A to Z website there is a description of how to make a hyperlink which you can leave on a comment so people can just click on it and reach your blog.

Many of you will be familiar with this white radish which hails from the orient. Although it was once from South East Asia, today it is grown all over that area. The Japanese make many different pickles from it. I have also discovered it is grown in North America but not for culinary purposes but to improve soil compaction. The leaves are sometimes harvested for animal fodder. I personally have only ever eaten them raw. A long white crunchy vegetable from the radish family, daikon is similar in appearance to fresh horseradish but packs a lighter peppery punch similar to watercress. Unlike other radishes, it is as good cooked as it is raw. It is also known as mooli.

Here is a recipe using daikon in a salad. I found this on BBC Good Food

Poached smoked salmon salad

Ingredients

For the smoked salmon

For the salad

To serve



Have a great day
 

45 comments:

  1. Not a fan of radishes of any kind but interesting to learn more about it and thanks for the reminder about the signature. I'd quite forgotten about it.

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    1. I love radishes Helen. Useful to have the hyperlink signature for strange blogs.

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  2. I too have heard many things about radish. They are very healthy...

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  3. Yummy! Would rather take them raw though. It is good for the system when unprocessed apparently! Nicely Jo!

    http://imagery77.blogspot.my/2016/04/safe-sex-awareness-enhanced-haibun.html


    Hank

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    1. I must admit I prefer them raw too Hank.

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  4. I do love pickled daikon. That sounds like a delicious recipe.
    Tasha
    Tasha's Thinkings | Wittegen Press | FB3X (AC)

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    1. Never had them pickled Natasha, sounds good.

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  5. Really nice to come across your blog today. Well-written post and good detail. I'm currently living in SE Asia, the place daikon originated!

    Open Minded Mormon A-Z

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    1. Thanks for dropping by Duncan. I hope you are enjoying living in SE Asia. Quite different.

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    2. I am absolutely loving it Jo! It's the perfect life over here and I may never return to my homeland

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    3. I had a friend who lived there too, forget exactly where, but she lived there for many years and loved it. When she did return she went to live in Cyprus because it was too cold elsewhere.

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  6. This is something that I really fancy much more than the Barley Casserole.

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    1. The Barley Casserole is delicious Bob, as are daikon.

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  7. I've seen 'daikon' in recipes and never knew what it was.

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    1. Now you do JoJo. Glad to be of service LOL

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  8. I've seen them in supermarkets but had no idea what they were.

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    1. If you like red radishes, you will like these Alex. They are good eaten raw, a bit stronger than the red ones though.

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    2. I was wrong, daikon are milder than red radishes, I had forgotten.

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  9. Have never had one, but love red radishes. Will have to try!

    Happy April 5th!
    Ninga Minion @YolandaRenee from
    Defending The Pen
    Parallels
    Murderous Imaginings

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    1. I don't eat them very often Yolanda. Don't know why.

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  10. I like pickled daikon. This recipe looks very intriguing. Exotic.

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    1. You're the second person to mention it pickled Stephanie. Sounds good.

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  11. I really want to try this one. Probably will try raw. I like my veggies cold and crunchy.
    Susan Says

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    1. Me too Susan, time I had some again.

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  12. Horse Radish has quite a peppery punch which I might just try out some day. It seems to me that it has the kick in it which might just do me the world of good.

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    1. Not the same thing though, Spacerguy, I love horseradish for my beef etc. But I don't think it has any relation to daikon. Just googled, it is considered a radish but is much more spicy than the daikon which is very mild, more so than a red radish I read.

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  13. Jo, I've never heard of daikine. I'm learning so mamy new things during this challenge.

    I’m exploring different types of dreams and their meanings.
    D is for Daydreaming and Downloads
    Stephen Tremp’s Breakthrough Blogs


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    1. Daikon Stephen are delicious. I have been following your dream sequence.

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  14. It's like a radish? I'll have to try it.

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    1. Yes, but milder. Japanese origin Diane.

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  15. One more thing I've learned after reading your blog, Jo. Love crunchy radish in salads. I'll see if I can spot daikon in the grocery store. The name sounds like a type of vacuum cleaner!

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    1. They are certainly crunchy Pinky. Don't think we have a vacuum name like that here.

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  16. I have never heard of this veggie but I am not one for radishes so I shall pass.

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    1. Ooh, love radishes of any kind Birgit.

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  17. I've tried this before. Do you know if I can buy a jar of duck fat somewhere?

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  18. What I meant to say was that I've tried daikon, but not your actual recipe. =)

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    1. I am not sure about purchasing duck fat. I would think it would be something you would have to make yourself from a duck, but I have no idea. Not the same but maybe butter would work as well Cynthia if it isn't possible to buy the duck fat.

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    2. Cynthia, I have just googled and you can buy duck fat, Amazon.com sell it amongst other sources.

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  19. I love, love, love, BBCGoodFood. Never tried daikon yet, but it's on my list to try :-)

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    1. They d have good recipes Ivy. Daikon should fit in fine with your eating.

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  20. I use daikon a lot and have grown it from time to time. It's basically a big long radish w/ a radish flavor. I also cook it and add to soups and last night to pasta sauce. When it cooks, the flavor becomes less sharp and hardly noticeable. It's also very healthy and considered a blood cleanser. It's a very popular vegetable in Hawaii. The Vietnamese sandwich place here shreds the daikon and uses it on sandwiches. When grated, the flavor is also milder. It's great in salads too. Maui Jungalow

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    1. I have never used it that much Courtney. I do like radishes and eat them raw although I have a recipe for cooking them. I eat them too quickly to get round to cooking them.

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