Wednesday, April 29, 2015

Y is for Yuca - A to Z Challenge 2015

 Yuca or CassavaI have just discovered there are two words, Yucca or Yuca which mean two entirely different plants. There are some parts of some Yuccas which can be eaten, but the Yuca or Cassava is more widely used as a food plant. It is native to South America and when dried and ground is known as tapioca. If that’s the same tapioca as used in Britain as a milk pudding, Yuca PlantI have eaten it many times, we used to call it frogspawn. It is the third largest source of food carbohydrates in the tropics. Although Nigeria is one of the largest growers of Cassava in the world whilst Thailand is the biggest exporter of the dried root. If not prepared properly apparently it can impart lots of cyanide into the body causing all kinds of illnesses. And they used to feed it to us kids in school. Guess I am lucky to be alive LOL

The following recipe comes from the Cayman Islands and looked delicious to me.

Cassava Heavy Cake
Travel by Stove
Country: The Cayman Islands

Makes: 12-16 servings
Cassava Heavy CakeIngredients:
  • 2 14 oz cans coconut milk
  • 2 tbsp vanilla
  • 1 tbsp cinnamon
  • 2 tsp nutmeg
  • 1/4 cup butter
  • 2 cup light brown sugar
  • 6 cup grated cassava (yucca)
Directions:
  1. Put all the ingredients except the cassava into a large pot. Bring to a boil, then reduce heat and simmer until the mixture starts to separate.
  2. At this point there should be foam forming on the surface--skim the foam off the top of the mixture and save it (you'll be using it later).
  3. Add the grated cassava and pour the mixture into an 8 x 15 inch greased baking pan.
  4. Bake at 350 or until the cake is no longer jiggly in the center, which should take about 20 minutes.
  5. Using a pastry brush, spread about half of the foam you reserved from that earlier step over the top of the cake. Now return it to the oven and bake for another 20 minutes, then remove and repeat.
  6. When the top is brown and the edges of the cake start to pull away from the pan, it's ready.
  7. Note: Don't store this cake in the fridge, because refrigeration will ruin the texture. Instead let it sit out for a day without covering (to prevent sweating), then you can keep it at room temperature for about five days.
Have a great day
Jo

38 comments:

  1. now we know why we learned to spell- tapica -yucc, or is it yuc?

    zannierose A-Z

    http://dna-activation.webs.com/apps/blog/

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    1. Sorry, you lost me there Zannie

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  2. That's interesting, Jo. My mother loved tapioca - and it certainly did look like frog spawn - and we would be regularly presented with it. I loathed it along with baked custard, porridge and rice and sago puddings. I simply couldn't swallow them, something to do with the texture, and eventually Mum gave up. She was a brilliant cook - and I wasn't a picky eater - but even she couldn't make it palatable to me. In the end she used to cook it for herself and Dad as a special treat.

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    1. I never liked tapioca although I liked all the other milk puddings we used to get. The other things you mentioned, I liked and still do not that I eat them very often any more. I make an almond rice pudding, delicious.

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  3. I've never seen cassava in the stores, or yuca, then again,I've never looked for it. The cake does look yummy. Tapioca was never my thing though I love most puddings, especially rice.

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    1. Nor have I Denise, but then I haven't looked either. I found me a Dragon Fruit yesterday though.

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  4. We called tapioca pudding 'fish eye pudding'. I was never a fan. Bubble tea is a hugely popular drink in Western Washington State (and perhaps other places as well but I saw a lot of Bubble Tea stores out there), and I understand the bubbles are made with large tapioca pearls. Never tried it though. Tempted but never did.

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    1. Never heard of bubble tea. Doesn't sound like something I would want to drink. I would try it, but.......

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  5. I just like to say... frogspawn. always a fan of tapioca... have not had it in awhile. great post from start to finish...

    Jeremy [Retro]
    AtoZ Challenge Co-Host [2015]

    There's no earthly way of knowing.
    Which direction we are going!

    HOLLYWOOD NUTS!
    Come Visit: You know you want to know if me or Hollywood... is Nuts?

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    1. Well you are one of the rare ones Jeremy. Many of us did NOT like the stuff one bit. I think the cake above looks good though.

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  6. I still shudder at the thought of frogspawn in school dinners many years ago.

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    1. You and me both Bob. That's the only place I ever had it. My mother made lots of puddings but never tapioca thank God.

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  7. I'd be skeptical preparing yuca. The cake looks yummy, though! :)

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    1. I wouldn't mind trying it but I don't suppose we can get it here.

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  8. What a handsome looking cake. Yum!

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    1. I thought so, I would love to try it Stephanie

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  9. Cyanide? Wow. Not sure I'd want to eat something that is the spawn of a frog.

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    1. I was a little perplexed at the cyanide. Not really frog spawn Alex just looks like it.

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  10. Another food item I am glad I didn't eat much of as a child :)

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    1. Didn't you get it shoved at you for dessert in school Mark, we certainly did.

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  11. Frogspawn doesn't sound very appetising. I've heard of tapioca pudding but never tried it.

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    1. We kids all got it forced on us at lunchtime Pinky. It was supposed to be so good for us. I never minded semolina pudding or rice, but tapioca, no way. There are people who enjoy it.

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  12. Yucca,sounds even liiks interesting one. I think its possible to make rope out of it.

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    1. Ah but are you talking yucca or yuca. Two different plants.

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  13. Hi human, Jo,

    My human had no idea about the two different plants. The recipe looks nice. However, my human should stay away from stuff with that much sugar.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny :)

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    1. Hi Penny. I didn't know the difference either until I started researching. As for the recipe, if you check it out it is 12 to 16 servings which means each piece would not have very much sugar at all. I am pawsitive you hadn't thought of that. I do hope your human is getting better. Best wishes to you too Penny, and to Gary of course.

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  14. I didn't know where tapioca came from so this was interesting and that you want to make sure it is prepared the right way

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    1. No nor did I Birgit, interesting the things we find out on A to Z. I wonder how many English cooks, who used to prepare this in particular for us school kids, knew how dangerous it could

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  15. That looks delicious! This is the first time I have visited your blog. It's a great read with some great recipes. I have managed to complete the A to Z Challenge - a miracle! I'm at www.thatspurrfect.blogspot.com

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    1. Thanks for your visit PL. Glad you have managed to go right through to the end.

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  16. The fact that it may contain cyanide is pretty frightening. The preparation is key. The recipe sounds tasty, and I've heard wonderful things about coconut milk.

    Julie

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    1. It is a bit scary Julie, but thousands of British kids survived tapioca puddings so it can't be that dangerous. I have heard lots of good things about coconut milk too.

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  17. Hi Jo - I'm not keen on frogspawn .. all the others, especially semolina, I loved ..

    I think you'd need to have bucket loads of the stuff .. like almonds they've got a touch of arsenic in them .. like pear drops taste sometimes ...

    I think I'll forego the heavy cake - though the ingredients look deliciously too much ! Cheers Hilary

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    1. Funny isn't it Hilary? we had it inflicted on us in our school days and most have never liked it since. I like semolina and rice though. The kernels of peach stones (which I always used to eat) are supposed to have arsenic too.

      Yes, looks too moreish.

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  18. I used to eat them all the time, because the one market sold great ones. Energizing little treat with long-lasting effects. Loved it.

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    1. Interesting Ivy, never come across it.

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    2. I haven't seen them in years. Actually, I even forgot about them until I read your post. Now I'm on the hunt for dragon fruit.

      I tried my first organic medjool date yesterday. Holy cow, so good. Up until now, I've only eaten the dried ones.

      Do you like dates?

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    3. Love 'em Ivy but don't often get the chance to eat them sadly.

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