Thursday, April 23, 2015

T is for Tomatillo - A to Z Challenge

TomatilloAlso known as the Husk Tomato or Mexican Husk Tomato, when ripe, the fruit can be several colours including yellow, red, green, or even purple. The freshness and greenness of the husk are quality criteria. They are a key ingredient in Mexican and Central American green sauces. As far as I am aware I have never eaten one although I have often seen them for sale in local supermarkets. Mexican food is very popular these days.
Salsas are very popular too although in fact the word salsa simply means sauce but these days has come to mean a relish like additive.

Somebody commented about a white squirrel yesterday. I just had to find a picture of it to show everyone. It obviously is an albino with the red eyes. But a pretty looking critter.


Three Chile Dry Roasted Tomatillo Salsa

AllRecipes.com

A wonderful vegan Three Chile Tomatillo Salsa. The tomatillos and chiles are dry roasted (slightly blackened) in an iron skillet giving it a wonderful flavor. Great for green chilaquiles.

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Next3 chile roasted tomatillo salsa
recipe makes 12 Servings
  • 1 pound tomatillos, unhusked
  • 2 serrano chile peppers
  • 2 jalapeno chile peppers
  • 8 pequin chile peppers
  • 4 cloves garlic
  • 1 small whole onion, peeled
  • 1/4 cup chopped cilantro
  • salt to taste
Directions
  1. Place the tomatillos, chiles, garlic cloves, and onion in a dry, cast iron pan. Toast, turning occasionally over medium-high heat until the husks of the tomatillos have blackened and their skins turn translucent. The goal is to soften the tomatillos by blackening the skin without allowing them to split. Remove from pan, and allow to cool slightly.
  2. Remove the husks from the tomatillos and the stems from the peppers. Place into the bowl of a food processor with the cilantro and salt to taste; process to desired consistency. Pour the salsa into a saucepan, and cook over medium heat for about 5 minutes to mellow the flavors and remove the raw taste.
Have a great day
Jo

27 comments:

  1. Thank you for the Tomatillo salsa recipe. can't wait to try this!

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    1. I expect they are available in the bigger towns.

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  3. This looks and sounds yummy!

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  4. Hi Jo - I've never had a husk tomato .. while the Tomatillo salsa recipe does sound good .. cheers Hilary

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    1. It's certainly will be one on my "to try" list Hilary

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  5. Squirrels are such active, energetic creatures. I was watching one the other day and as it moved it leapt into the air with sprightly hops. I was amazed to see him run vertically up a wall and so fast too. Foraging for food he held his food with both hands as he ate looking round the whole time.

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    1. We used to watch squirrels a lot in North Carolina. We always had lots of them in our back yard. We had to cut branches off a tree to stop them leaping over to the bird feeder. Matt was considering entering one of them for the Olympic long jump.

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  6. I've seen that in the grocery store but didn't know what it was. If they use it for salsa, I doubt I could eat it.

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    1. They are used for other things too Diane. You should check into it.

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  7. I've seen tomatillos in recipes but I don't know if I've seen them in my supermarket...but then again I don't think I've looked either.

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    1. They are certainly in our supermarket JoJo. I have never tried them yet though.

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  8. I bet that chile salsa is awesome! Bring on the heat.

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    1. It would go with your boobs, blood and carnage

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  9. Tomatillo Salsa I think makes up much of Salsa Verde and it is delicious with hardly any calories at all. Frontera Grill makes a nice bottled one. We also use them in stews in the slow cooker. Where I live there are many Mexican American markets and they are very popular to eat here. Your recipe looks great. Thanks for sharing.

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    1. Lucky you Stephanie. There are things I would like to get but can't. Nopalitos for instance. I think they are imported into Canada but I can't find out where.

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  10. I ate a tomatillo raw thinking it would be tasty like a tomato, it was awful. I'll have to try one cooked and prepared.

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    1. Yes Liz, they are not like tomatoes at all I gather. The Mexicans eat them a lot. Should talk to Al.

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  11. My husband would love this salsa! Love the white squirrel, so very cute. I did what Elizabeth did and never bought another tomatillo! Lisa, co-host AtoZ 2015, @ http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

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    1. You'll have to make it then Lisa, I knew, somehow, that they were not for eating like tomatoes.

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  12. I wonder why there are no squirrels in Australia. Foxes and rabbits were introduced so you'd think the odd squirrel might have made it over. They are pretty creatures. I think I like the red ones best.

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    1. As you say, maybe nobody brought any over. Bearing in mind what happened with rabbits, probably a good thing. I think the white ones are so pretty, except for the pink eye.

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  13. We have neighbours who grew these "tomatoes" last year. They had yellow one and purple! I did not know they were called this name. To me, they tasted like a tomato:) The salsa sounds yummy. The squirrel is really a cutie-they should name it Johnny Winter:)

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  14. Hi human, Jo,

    That's just the kind of recipe my human likes. I would love to meet a white squirrel. Something new to chase.

    Pawsitive wishes,

    Penny

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    1. I am pawsitive you would have fun chasing a white squirrel Penny - I hope your human is feeling well enough to try this recipe. Give him a good lick from me.

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