Monday, April 13, 2015

K is for Kumquat - A to Z Challenge 2015

KumquatThe Kumquat is native to Asia and the Asia Pacific region. They have been cultivated in many countries for a very long time. They were introduced to Europe in 1846 by Robert Fortune, collector for the London Horticultural Society, and shortly thereafter into North America. The edible fruit apparently resembles an orange in flavour although very much smaller, about the size of an olive, and comes in round or oval shapes. They are frequently used as candies or used in jams and preserves. Grown in the Southern States, they have also been used to flavour Martinis instead of the ubiquitous olive. There is much interesting information in the Wikipedia article. The fruit is celebrated annual in Dade City, Florida with a Kumquat Festival. It seems to me that it is very much under appreciated in many areas. I must see if I can find them locally.

There are many recipes using Kumquats, but this is one from the Kumquat Growers based in Florida. They have lots of recipes on their website.

Kumquat Refrigerator Pie


  • 1 baked pie crust, 9 " kumquatpie
  • 1 (8 oz.) Cool Whip whipped topping
  • 2/3 cup puréed Kumquats
  • 1 can condensed milk
  • 1/2 cup lemon juice
Beat condensed milk and whipped topping. Add lemon juice and beat until thickened. Add pureed kumquats, pour in pie shell and chill in refrigerator for several hours.

Kumquat Purée Preparation


Wash fruit, cut in half and remove seeds. Place in blender or food chopper (A blender makes a finer puree). Do not cook. Use puree in recipes as called for or freeze in zip-lock bags or other freezer containers. Frozen kumquat puree can be stored for six months or more. When you use frozen puree .. defrost and drain the excess liquid before using.

Have a great day
Jo_thumb[2]

44 comments:

  1. Looks like a plum to me. I shall have to look out for one to try.

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    1. Well HIlary is familiar with them so presumably they are available in the UK.

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  2. I love this fruit. They appear only during a particular season but they are really yummy and refreshing.

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    1. I have never eaten them, I don't even know if they are available here. I must check it out.

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  3. I don't think I've actually eaten one of these. But then, who knows.

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  4. Hi Jo - these are quite astringent, yet sweet .. I love them and savouring one or two are really good at getting the digestive juices going ... I'm sure I've had them candied, but we can buy them around .. not sure of their season or if they grow here ... I imagine Kumquat Pie would be very good .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Interesting Hilary, I never have eaten them. If you can get them in England I can't believe they wouldn't be available here. I must check it out.

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  5. I've never tasted one before. Back in the early 70s, the wives and girlfriends of the Grateful Dead started a hippie shop that they called Kumquat May. I always thought that was a cute name.

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  6. Looks DeLish! We are pie fans in my home. Thanks for the recipe!
    A to Z Blogger

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  7. If they're the size of an olive, sounds like a lot of work to peel a bunch of them.

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    1. Good cooking takes time Alex LOL

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  8. Never had one of these before. With that said, the pie sounds easy enough to make... but what do I do with all of those others bags of kumquat puree?

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    1. Make lots of pies and put them in the freezer for later. Or fling it at available politicians.

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  9. In the Philippines, they're common. So is its cousin, the calamondin. They put it in tea

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    1. That's interesting Jay. I have never heard of the calamondin. Why in tea? As a sweetener or as a flavor.

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  10. They are bigger than olives, and the only time I've ever tasted them, like Hilary said, they were bitter more than sweet, but then, I was told to eat them with the peeling on! Maybe that's why I haven't had them more often! Lisa, co-host AtoZ 2015, @ http://www.lisabuiecollard.com

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    1. I think, but don't know for sure, that they were growing in the front yard of the cottage we rented a few times in North Carolina. They were bitter sweet and I was told they made a wonderful jam.

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  11. I have heard of them but never tasted one and would love to! They are smaller than I thought

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    1. I'm not sure now whether I have tasted one or not.

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  12. Do you think you could use canned Kumquats?

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    1. If you can get them I don't see why not. You would have to be careful of the liquid content though.

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  13. You know this will never make my kitchen - as I am so uncouth when it comes to baking!

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    1. Maybe now you are back on the mainland you could go take a baking course. Might put hair on your....chest!

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  14. Oh my gosh! I love kumquats! And now that I know you can make a pie with them, I'me going to love them even more. :)

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    1. Glad you like the recipe David. Dunno if I can obtain them here or not.

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  15. I love the thought of a pie. We call them tarts over here but pie sounds nicer. Our pies are made of meat and gravy (sometimes apple).

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    1. To me if it's open its a tart and if it's got a crust on top it's a pie, but the North Americans seem to differ.

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  16. My parent's have a tree in the backyard but I've never really liked them. I'll try the pie, see how it goes. Thanks!

    Gina, I'm #1255 today, blogging at Book Dragon's Lair

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    1. I would love to see your parent's tree to compare with the tree I think was a Kumquat. Be interested as to whether you like the pie or not.

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    2. Next time I'm over, I'll check if it's still there.

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    3. I hope it is. If you can take a pic I would love to see it. You can email it perhaps.

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  17. I remember having a kumquat tree in our back yard when we lived in the San Diego area when I was growing up. I did like the taste of the fruit but we never cooked anything with it.

    betty

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    1. I was told they are best cooked into something.

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  18. That looks like a really tasty pie. We love pies, but are refraining at them moment as we recently returned from a cruise and need to loose a little weight.

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    1. That's the problem with cruises isn't it?

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  19. We had a kumquat tree at one time. They're gorgeous preserved in syrup.

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  20. i've never seen a kumquat pie before. This really looks delicious!

    Julie

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    1. Does look good doesn't it? Now all you have to do is get the kumquats.

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    1. Hopefully it would taste incredible too Danielle

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