Wednesday, June 11, 2014

Funeral. Lunch

Whilst at the doctor’s we were watching the funeral for the threeMountie funeral Mounties who were shot in Moncton, NB. They were holding it in the local arena as there were thousands there including Mounties from all over the country and other uniformed groups, I was unable to identify them, but it was a very impressive sight. The Prime Minister anMarchingd the Governor of Canada were there and last, but not least, the families entered. Then the caskets were brought in by a parade of Mounties (Royal Mounted Police) and each casket was borne by a troop of Mounties and draped with a Canadian flag. All that red from their uniforms together with the red flag was quite spectacular. I started to tear up and was glad we were called away before I really dissolved police-dog of Deceased Mountieinto tears. One of the three who were shot was a dog handler and there was at least one dog in the crowd, I am not sure if it was his dog or not – yes it was, this was his K-9 partner with another officer. There were also a lot of very young babies there which I thought was a bit stupid as the service was expected to take three hours. Quite a lot of young kids too. One part of the arena was a sea of red with all the uniforms.

Matt had a check up visit with his cardiac doc today (everything OK) Reubenbut we didn’t get out til late and as it was not local we went out for lunch. We went to a restaurant we hadn’t been to for a number of years, Galt View, which is right opposite the hospital in Cambridge and therefore does a huge business. We haven’t been there for a long time though and I realised it had changed hands, about a year ago Reuben2the waitress told me. The menu was much smaller and somewhat different. I ordered a Reuben and Matt had a BLT. I didn’t like the way they served the Reuben – not as a sandwich exactly, but more like an open faced sandwich. The mustard came in small packets which were impossible to open and when I finally did get one open I ended up with mustard squirting all over me, I was not happy. Anyway, I had to eat with a knife and fork – to me a sandwich should be something you can pick up – and I wasn’t happy. Nothing wrong with the taste, but I wouldn’t order one there again. Actually there was far too much corned beef on it anyway and the bread was too soggy to pick up. Matt’s BLT was fine.

Heinz KetchupOne thing that tickled me was the ubiquitous Heinz Ketchup. Made me think of when we first came to Canada and noticed every table had ketchup on it which was used profusely. I figured Heinz must be delighted with Canadians although I think I remember it being the same in the US. It may well be the same in England these days. Heinz ketchup was certainly available when we left, but you didn’t see it on every table in cafes and restaurants.  Of course you don’t see it on the table in gourmet restaurants.

OK, not asparagus today, saw this and thought it looked good. Me being me of course I wouldn’t use low fat anything. I would also make my own pesto, in fact regular basil pesto keeps well in the freezer, another thing I freeze in ice trays and then wrap and store.

Manicotti with Roasted Red Pepper Sauce


WebMD Recipe

If you’re feeding a crowd, double the recipe. Set each manicotti on top of a small pool of red pepper sauce on the dinner plate, or serve them with an ample drizzle of the red pepper sauce on top. If you want to skip roasting the peppers, substitute 1 cup of bottled roasted red peppers for the 2 sweet red peppers.
Manicotti with Roasted Red Pepper Sauce


Ingredients
  • 8 large dried manicotti pasta shells or similar
  • 2  sweet red peppers
  • 2 teaspoons olive oil
  • 1/2 cup 1% milk
  • 1 teaspoon minced garlic
  • 1 1/2 cups low-fat or part-skim ricotta cheese
  • 3/4 cup chopped spinach, thawed, with excess water gently squeezed out
  • 6 tablespoons shredded Parmesan cheese
  • 1/4 cup prepared pesto sauce, found in the frozen pasta section
  • 4  green onions, white and part of green, chopped
  • 1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
  • salt and pepper to taste
Instructions
  1. Preheat oven to 375°F. Coat a 9x13-inch baking dish with canola cooking spray.
  2. Boil manicotti shells according to directions on package until tender. Drain, rinse with cold water, and carefully set aside.
  3. While manicotti is boiling, turn on the broiler. Cut each red pepper into quarters and remove inside flesh and seeds. Cut each quarter in half to make eight strips total. Lay strips, skin side down, on a nonstick baking sheet (line with foil for easy cleanup, if desired). Brush the tops of pepper strips with olive oil. Broil until the top sides are nicely brown, watching carefully. Flip and broil until brown. Let peppers cool slightly. Preheat oven to 350°F.
  4. In a food processor, puree pepper strips with milk, garlic, and pepper to taste. Add salt to taste if desired. Keep sauce at a low simmer in a small, covered, nonstick saucepan while you bake the manicotti.
  5. Mix filling ingredients (ricotta, spinach, Parmesan cheese, pesto, green onions, and Italian seasonings) in a bowl with spoon or fork. Stuff shells with the cheese mixture. Arrange in a baking dish. Cover with foil and bake for 15 minutes, then uncover and bake 10 minutes more.
  6. Serve one or two manicotti shells per person; decorate each shell with ample red pepper sauce.
Have a great day
Jo

20 comments:

  1. Do you remember the radio show, 'Sergeant Preston and his Wonder Dog Yukon King?" I remember listening to it as a kid and imagining all the adventures they had. I was in love with the idea of the Royal Canadian Mounties. There are brave men and women everywhere. I always learn something from you, Jo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope, I guess it didn't make it to the UK. That dog, by the way, whimpered and cried the whole way through. Who says animals don't know. He must have been with his handler when the guy was killed.

      Delete
  2. I have very special feelings for Canada and I'm sorry for those Mounties.
    About your sandwich, look at the bright side, Grandmother, you didn't eat that much bread which is good for you diet. ;) Abrazos!

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was one hell of a service though.

      Tiene razon nieta. Abrazos!

      Delete
  3. Terrible thing that happened. The funeral was done with high honors though.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. It was an impressive funeral and I am glad I caught some of it.

      Delete
  4. Sometimes I like a good reuben, but soggy bread and falling apart doesn't sound good to me either.

    Tragic event in Canada. Those red uniforms do create quite a spectacle. I recall the changing of the guard at the Parliament in Ottawa was pretty impressive.

    Lee
    Tossing It Out

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Nope, it certainly wasn't.

      Don't they just. Never seen the changing of the guard either in Ottawa or at Buckingham Palace.

      Delete
  5. So sad about those poor RCMP officers. :(

    I love manicotti, although my Italian family pronounced more like, 'mannacot', leaving off the 'i' at the end. I haven't had it, or lasagna, in years.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Wasn't it but they had a great send off.

      Lasagne is a staple in Canada I think. I never make it myself but I certainly have made similar things to this recipe.

      Delete
  6. My husband is the the emperor of ketchup users (although we call it tomato sauce over here) and my kids are the same. What a disappointment that sandwich sounded Jo.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. In this house we generally assume the food to be tasty enough not to need it and anyone who ate it on everything (I have met people like that) and wanted it for what I had cooked, would certainly never be invited again at the least.

      You're right it was a disappointment. I am still finding mustard on my purse/handbag etc. too.

      Delete
  7. Hi, Jo. I'm saying prayers for the families of the three Mounties who were shot. What a tragedy.

    My son and I like reubens and you've got to be able to pick them up to fully enjoy them. : ) Sorry about the mustard mishap. Those condiment packets are really hard to open sometimes. I've had a few mishaps with salsa packets myself.

    The manicotti looks good. Thanks for sharing the recipe.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Thanks on their behalf.

      I guess one of these days I will try again somewhere else. I haven't had one for years because they used to give me appalling indigestion, but now on meds. I am still finding traces of mustard on stuff.

      You're welcome

      Delete
  8. Hi Jo - it's good to read about the funeral of the three officers - so sad and I'm sure the people there were paying their respects .. small, tinies and all ages - as you did watching ...

    Those tiny packets of sauces are 'horrid' and so difficult to open - and we do have tomato sauce on offer just about everywhere ... not always on the table - but not too far away ..

    The pasta looks interesting ... off to Birling Gap today in the sunshine .. to see the cracks! and tea at the new National Trust Centre showing geologiy of the area ... better charge my camera ... cheers Hilary

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. Where is Birling Gap, unfamiliar with it. Sounds like you are going to have a fun time though.

      Delete
  9. I always make up lots of pesto and freeze it, too. The bought stuff isn't anywhere near as good.

    ReplyDelete
    Replies
    1. You are so right. Have you tried the asparagus pesto I posted. That's great.

      Delete