Monday, April 14, 2014

L is for Lipizzan and Lüchow’s Sauerbraten

L
I would like to wish a wonderful and happy Passover to all my Jewish friends.

Lippizan
I first came across Lipizzan stallions in a book by Mary Stewart called Airs Above the Ground. A great story about a stolen horse. I started to research them off and on and learned quite a lot about these wonderful horses. In January I saw a documentary by Nature and went looking once more to discover a whole raft of videos aLippizan2bout these fantastic horses. Although predominantly white, there are occasionally brown horses and traditionally at the Spanish Riding School in Vienna, Austria, there is always one brown horse in the performances. They demonstrate the haute ècole style of riding and it is wonderful to watch, particularly I love to see what is known as “airs above the ground” which were actually developed from battle movements horses were trained to do. The stud farm is at Piber, Austria and this is where all the horses were moved during World War II. Breeding is strictly controlled and only horses which have proved particularly adept at the haute ècole are allowed to become studs. The females also have to go through rigorous tests too. To go to the Spanish Riding School in Vienna is on my bucket list.

I love Sauerbraten and used to make it quite often. However, I made it with a single roast of beef, not steaks. For some reason I haven’t made it in quite a while. I have German/Canadian friends who cook it for Christmas Eve dinner every year. Reading it through, kidney fat is what I would call suet.
 

Lüchow’s Sauerbraten

By Belgophile
Photo
Photo by Belgophile
  • Servings: 6-8

 

"Lüchow’s was a grand German restaurant and New York City landmark on East 14th Street. Sadly, it closed in 1982 after one hundred years. I grew up hearing my grandmothers and parents talk of the place as a special destination, and was lucky enough to have dined there a couple of times in the years just before it closed. I’m also lucky to have found a copy of “Lüchow’s German Cookbook” (1952) from which I take this recipe for their signature dish. (With one exception, I have transcribed the recipe precisely: the original calls for kidney fat; I have substituted vegetable oil.)"
 

Ingredients

    • 3 lbs round steaks
    • 1 tablespoon salt
    • 1/2 teaspoon pepper
    • 2 onions, sliced
    • 1 carrot, sliced
    • 1 stalk celery, chopped
    • 4 cloves
    • 4 peppercorns
    • 1/2 pint red wine vinegar
    • 2 bay leaves
    • 2 tablespoons vegetable oil ( or kidney fat)
    • 6 tablespoons butter
    • 3 tablespoons flour
    • 1 tablespoon sugar
    • 5 gingersnaps, crushed
    • potato dumplings ( see Luchow's Kartoffel Klasse)

Directions

  1. Wipe steak with damp cloth, season with salt and pepper. Place in earthen, glass, or enamelware bowl. Combine onions, carrot, celery, cloves, peppercorns, vinegar, and bar leaves and 2-1/2 pints water, or enough to cover meat. Cover and put in refrigerator 4 days.
  2. On fifth day remove from refrigerator, drain meat, sauté in vegetable oil and 1 tablespoon butter in enamelware, glass or earthenware utensil, until seared on all sides. Add marinade liquid and bring to boil, then lower heat and let simmer about 3 hours.
  3. Melt remaining 5 tablespoons butter in a pan. Stir flour smoothly into it. Add sugar, blend, and let brown to nice dark color. Add to simmering meat mixture. Cover and continue cooking until meat is tender, about 1 hour longer.
  4. Remove meat to a warmed serving platter. Stir crushed gingersnaps into the pot juices and cook until thickened. Pour this special sauerbraten gravy over meat. Serves 6 or more.
  5. Serve with Potato or Bread Dumplings. A fine full-bodied red wine is a fitting complement to this well-known dish. A favorite with our guests is Pommard Burgundy.
Have a great day
Jo (2)

22 comments:

  1. I never knew about the brown Lipizzans.

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    1. I'd forgotten until I saw the video earlier this year.

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  2. I did get to see the stallions when I was in Vienna. Quite impressive.

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    1. I couldn't have visited Vienna without seeing them. I have wanted to do so for many years.

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  3. What an interesting recipe. i've brined beef before, it surprises me that it doesn't have more salt in it... I have a couple of tough cuts from a bulk purchase we made that I could definitely experiment with...

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    1. I's absolutely delicious. It wasn't this recipe I used but one from a Time Life series of International cookbooks Do try the recipe, it's good.

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  4. Hi Jo .. I've always wanted to see the Lippizzaners .. but have never made it - they look stunning .. but I too didn't know about the one symbolic brown horse ...

    I'm not so sure about the Sauerbraten .. but interesting to know their recipe book is still around ... and you could glean a recipe from it .. cheers Hilary

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    1. Me too Hilary. I have seen American Lippizzans but they were in more of a circus setting and not really very good, in fact disappointing.

      I love Sauerbraten even though I haven't made it for a long time.

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  5. I watched the Lippizzaners in Viena...what a fantastic show!

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    1. Now I am green with envy. You lucky girl.

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  6. That one horse looks like he's flying. All he needs are wings.

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    1. Can you imagine what it's like to be at the Spanish Riding School and see horses doing that?

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  7. I never heard of these horses, they are beautiful. I am looking forward to learning more about them.
    I loved reading the history behind the recipe.
    doreenmcgettigan.com

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    1. Doreen, if you Google, you should be able to find video of them actually performing in Austria. You will be amazed.

      I have simply got to make that recipe again

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  8. I remember seeing Lippazaner horses in my Brittanica Children's Encyclopedias when I was a kid. They are pretty cool.

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    1. Very cool I think. They undergo such rigorous training too.

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  9. Such beautiful animals!

    Oh, and sorry about the Leg of Lamb!

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    Replies
    1. Yes, and you almost put me off dinner.

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  10. I have always thought horses were so majestic. I think these are just amazing.

    Brandon Ax: Writer's Storm

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    1. They are fantastic especially if you watch them perform. I would love to go to Vienna and see them there.

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  11. I had 2 friends whose families made sauerbraten very different from each other...not picking favorites!

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    1. Well, the recipe I have used in the past is not quite the same as this one.

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