Tuesday, April 1, 2014

A is for Albatross and Amaretto Syllabub.

A
Albatrosses are large sea birds which are found in the Southern Ocean and the Northern Pacific. They are not found in the Atlantic Albatrossalthough fossils show that they once lived in that ocean. There are different species, but the largest of them all has a wing span of 12 ft. That is huge. They often follow ships as I guess they know various edibles are likely to be jettisoned from the galleys. The Samuel Taylor Coleridge poem, The Rime of the Ancient Mariner, was based on the killing of an albatross which was supposed to be unlucky.  In fact it turns out that the albatross was often killed for food despite the fact that sailors are some of the most superstitious people in the world. They start breeding later than most birds and have complicated courting dances to entice a mate. They spend a lot of time in the air and banded birds have been tracked circumnavigating the globe in their extensive travels. Apparently the Maori use their wing bones to carve flutes. The albatross is a threatened species; once due to man stealing feathers and today because of introduced species in their nesting areas such as rats and feral cats which eat their eggs. A Laysan albatross, named "Wisdom" on Midway Island is recognized as the oldest wild bird in the world; she was first banded in 1956 by Chandler Robbins.  A legend is that the soul of  a sailor lost at sea ends up as an Albatross which inspired me to write a poem too.

The Albatross

With wings outstretched
You sail the skies
And, so they say
When a sailor dies
His soul departs
And enters you
To guard o’er ships.
If this be true
Then when you soar
On thermals fine
I pray you, guard
This ship of mine.
Jo Wake
To me, this sounds absolutely delicious. I love syllabubs and the addition of Amaretto has got to improve it no end.


AMARETTO SYLLABUB

Nigella Lawson

  • 2.8 fl oz (80 ml) amaretto liqueur
  • 1 oz (25g) caster sugar
  • ½ fl oz (15 ml) lemon juice
  • 0.4 pt (225 ml) double cream
  • 1 (8 oz (225g) ) packet amaretti morbidi (soft almond macaroons) 

Method 

Pour the amaretto liqueur into a bowl with the sugar and lemon juice and whisk using light, rapid sweeping strokes to thicken or thoroughly combine ingredients. You can also use a whisk attachment of a food processor. Whisk in the double cream and whip this mixture until it has thickened but is still soft and billowy.

Crumble 2 little amaretti biscuits into each of the 4 glasses (each with a yield of about 180ml).

Divide the syllabub between the glasses on top of the crumbled biscuits.

Crumble another cookie or 2, and sprinkle this golden rubble over the top of all the glasses to give a fine sprinkle of crumbs on each. Serve the remaining amaretti alongside the syllabub.

Have a great day
Jo (2)

56 comments:

  1. Such majestic birds, and I love the look of that pudding. Have set up a link to your blog from my post today http://rosieamber.wordpress.com/

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    1. Thanks Rose. I will visit you later. Gotta go for bloodwork now

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  2. Hi Jo - the information on Albatrosses is good to know - and I know they're endangered .. sad what we're doing in the world.

    Syllabub - I love and used to make a lot .. this Amaretto one sounds delicious and definitely has a Nigella ring to it ..

    Cheers and good start! Hilary

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    1. Isn't it? That is why I support anything to do with conservation.

      I love syllabub too. Thanks.

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  3. Hi Jo - then I failed to comment on the poem ... it's really good and a fun read! Congratulations .. Hilary

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    1. Thanks Hilary, glad you liked it.

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  4. You should write poetry more often Jo. I would love to see an albatross.

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    1. I have a book full Bob. I don't write it often these days, but when I was younger I wrote a lot.

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  5. Happy A to Z challenge, Jo. Great first entry.

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  6. That's one heck of a wingspan.
    I guess a recipe for albatross would've been a bit much!

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    1. It is huge isn't it? And yes, it would, maybe roasted?

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  7. You wrote that poem? Wow! I like it very much.
    And I love the taste of amaretto. So long since I had one. That recipe must be delicious

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    1. I wrote you one once on FB.

      Hopefully. Haven't tried it yet.

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  8. My favorite thing about the a-z challenge is meeting people and learning new things. I never heard of these birds. They are beautiful.
    I love Amaretta:)
    doreenmcgettigan.com

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    1. Thanks Doreen, nice to meet you too. They are beautiful birds aren't they?

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  9. Oh my gosh, that recipe sounds delicious, Jo! I love amaretto.

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    1. I love syllabubs of all kinds.

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  10. Your poem is just plain lovely. Well done! I've always been fascinated by the albatross. It was nice to learn more.
    Skipping the sugary recipe, no offense ;-)
    We're off to a smashing start!
    Tina @ Life is Good
    A to Z Team @ Blogging From A to Z April Challenge 2014

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    1. Thanks Tina, it is an interesting bird.

      I understand, I shouldn't eat it either, but I will if I make it.

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  11. I loved the receipe and the poem .....too good :)

    Julekha :http://jk-thoughtcanvas.blogspot.in/2014/04/a-allah-almighty.html

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    1. Thanks Julekha and thanks for dropping by

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  12. Wonderful start, lovely poem and an interesting note that despite being superstitious they ate the bird. I guess once again releasing the soul of a fellow sailor? Amaretto has a smooth taste!

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    1. Have you ever read the Rime of the Ancient Mariner, it's all about what happens to a sailor who does kill an albatross.

      Sure does.

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    1. Thanks, I used to write a lot of poetry once.

      Love syllabubs.

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  14. You poem is inspiring. I can see a story there and if I wasn't in the middle of another one I'd start writing it. For now, I'll just make some notes!

    Visiting from A to Z Challenge.

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    1. A story? Hmm. Interesting thought.

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  15. Poem and dessert, what could be better. I actually saw an albatross on our cruise. He was following our ship and it made my day very special, a once in a lifetime sighting.

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    1. Lucky you, I don't think many of us have ever seen one. Yes, it would be a once in a lifetime sighting.

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  16. I don't think I've ever read your poetry, Jo. This one's flawless. I really enjoyed it.

    I'm thinking that amaretto drink would taste divine, chilled. Yummy.

    Be well.

    xoRobyn

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    1. Thanks Robyn. I posted one a couple of years ago http://tinyurl.com/nzkf9x7

      By the way, it's a dessert, not a drink. Much too thick for drinking.

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  17. Such a beautiful poem and that amaretto drink looks like heaven!

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    1. Thanks Chrystal. Also, as I just wrote above, it's a dessert. Much to thick to drink. You whip it up until it becomes very thick.

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  18. That was interesting thanks, and will definitely pop back for more recipes.
    good luck with the challenge.

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  19. I did not know they aren't in the Atlantic. I wonder if they used to be.

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    1. I think Wiki said there had been remains found in the Atlantic. Don't quote me on that though.

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  20. I've never tried a syllabub before, and now I'm convinced I have to have one. Have to.

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    1. They are delicious. Thanks for dropping by.

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  21. That dessert sounds delicious! And I've always been a fan of the Rime of the Ancient Mariner. My mother would quote it to me. Water, water everywhere and how the boards did shrink. Water, water, everywhere, yet not a drop to drink. Ahh. Good times. lol.

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    1. Yes, that's the bit I always quote to myself although I have the full poem in my Oxford Book of Poetry. Thanks for visiting.

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  22. I love anything amaretto. Now I want to pick up a bottle of almond amaretto on the way home. But I'll wait until it's closer to the weekend.

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    1. Hope you enjoy it Stephen, let me know if you do make it.

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  23. I've honestly never heard of a syllabub... the things you learn.

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    1. They're wonderful Rusty. If you get a chance you should try one.

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  24. Lovely poem and a delicious dessert. One too many helpings and I'd be soaring right along side that albatross!

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    1. Thanks. Wouldn't that be fun to fly.

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  25. You reminded me of the professor who taught us this " rime of ancient mariner" :)

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    1. Don't remember where I first learnt it.

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  26. What a wonderful poem, and I would love to see more of them! That dessert looks absolutely mouth watering!

    Julie

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    1. Thanks Julie.

      My mouth is definitely watering.

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