Saturday, April 27, 2013

X = Xanadu and Xanthia.

a-to-z-letters-x
As long as I can remember I have known the opening lines of this piece of poetry, why I knew them I have no idea.
In Xanadu did Kubla Khan
A stately pleasure-dome decree:
Where Alph, the sacred river, ran
Through caverns measureless to man
Down to a sunless sea.
So twice five miles of fertile ground
With walls and towers were girdled round:
And here were gardens bright with sinuous rills,
Where blossomed many an incense-bearing tree;
And here were forests ancient as the hills,
Enfolding sunny spots of greenery.
XanaduXanadu has always been considered somewhat exotic. It turns out the stately pleasure dome was Kubla-Kahn’s summer palace and inspired Samuel Taylor Coleridge to write the poem. The palace was visited by Marco Polo in 1275 but the poem wasn’t written til 1797. Today, only ruins remain, surrounded by a grassy mound that was once the city walls. Since 2002, restoration effort has been undertaken. In June 2012, Xanadu was made a World Heritage Site.

Last year posted a Chinese recipe for this letter, I was expecting to have to again, but found this one instead.

Xanthia Cocktail

 Ingredients

1 Part Ginxanthia(95)
1 Part Yellow Chartreuse
(A milder version of Green Chartreuse, both being made in Voiron, France. But the herbal mixture that the spirits are based upon, are made and known by three monks only. Mysterious!)
1 Part Cherry Brandy
How to mix this cocktail
Fill a mixing glass with ice cubes. Add all ingredients. Stir and strain into a chilled cocktail glass.

Have a great weekend.

Jo_thumb[2]

25 comments:

  1. How well three monks can keep secrets? :)
    It is the first time I read the Xanadu poem.

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    1. Most of us don't read the poem, just know the first couple of lines I think.

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  2. Congratulations to you,Jo. You found not only one, but Two "X" words. I really like the Xanadu poem, and have long heard of Kubla Kahn, but learned more today!!

    As for the Xanthia cocktail.... will have to put it on my "must try" list for the summer!!

    Patricia, Sugar & Spice & All Things ? Nice

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    1. It does sound like a good cocktail doesn't it.

      I was pleased to find out so much more about Xanadu. Funnily enough Alex mentioned the poem too.

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  3. I'm so uncultured. I hear Xanadu and my mind immediately goes to Olivia Newton John.

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    1. LOL, I do like the song Xanadu mind you.

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  4. Hi Jo .. love the Xanthia cocktail - what a great drink .. though something I wouldn't drink - but love the sound of it!

    Xanadu is such a brilliant poem .. cheers Hilary

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    1. You should try it some time. I am sure it will be great. Have to have it in a bar as I don't have any of those liqueurs.

      It is a brilliant poem and conjurs up such fantasies.

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  5. We can only imagine what the place looked like in its glory.

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  6. That is a beautiful poem.

    I need to try that drink now! I'm afraid, I've been put on notice though. I am not "allowed" to buy any more booze until I finish the bottles I have. Glugalug?

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    1. Well drink up all the booze you have - need any help?

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  7. What a lovely poem.
    And the place sounds incredibly exotic, much like the drink!

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    1. I guess to us, especially in these days when not much is exotic, it would sound more so to us.

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  8. Jo, I remember this poem when I was younger, the cocktail sounds interesting, probably wouldn't be able to drink all of it thought!

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    1. That's when I first heard it as a kid in school.

      I would imagine this cocktail is pretty lethal.

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  9. I've always liked that name Kubla Khan! Looks like it must have been a beautiful place at one time. I would have loved to have seen it!

    Beautiful poem! And the drink tops it off!

    Thanks for the history lesson, Jo! You have a great weekend also!

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    1. You too Betty, thanks for dropping by.

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  10. Jo, I dont know why I know those lines too...but Id rather know the cocktail.

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    1. Really? Do visit some time LOL

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  11. I knew the opening line of the poem, that was it, and was always curious to know the background.

    I'd probably pass on the cocktail. But lots of fascinating info in your X post, including the detail about the monks. Thanks.

    Barbara
    Y is for Yesterday (quotes & motivation)
    The Daille-y News

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    1. Thanks Barbara, I must admit I didn't really remember the whole poem although I heard it as a kid.

      We have gin in the house, all I need is the two liqueurs, bit expensive though just to try a drink you might not like.

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  12. Adore Coleridge, but didn't know that little bit of history, thanks.
    The cocktail sounds lethal:)
    Good post.
    #atozchallenge
    maggie at expat brazil

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    1. It does sound pretty lethal doesn't it? Thanks for dropping by.

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